How are printed sources referenced in Chicago?

This is the first of two lessons about Referencing Sources in Chicago. To complete this course, read each lesson carefully and then unlock and complete our materials to check your understanding.   

– Introduce the concept of the Chicago style of referencing

– Study example footnotes and bibliographies for 13 printed source types in the Chicago style

– Use activity worksheets to check progress and understanding and to improve English proficiency

Lesson 1

There are many styles of referencing that students may be asked to use at university, but one of the most commonly required is the Chicago style – particularly in the humanities. While this style can also use citations and references in an author-date format, much like the Harvard style, it is much more common for students to use a combination of notes and a bibliography. Our short courses on adding Chicago footnotes and writing Chicago bibliographies can be combined with this course on source types for comprehensive Chicago referencing.

Lesson 1 provides reference elements and example source details for the most common printed sources, with Lesson 2 exploring the digital source types. As well as providing unformatted and formatted details for students to compare (separated with ‘|’), we’ve included an example footnote (orange) and bibliography entry (blue). Students should remember to replicate the rules of formatting highlighted in these examples, such as CAPITALS, commas (,) or italics, in their own essays.

 

(1) Books

  1. Authors’ names: John Dickinson | John Dickinson,
  2. Title of book: Guide to Academic Writing | Guide to academic writing
  3. Publication place: New York | (New York:
  4. Publisher name: Academic Publications | Academic Publications,
  5. Publication year: 2015 | 2015),
  6. Page numbers: 49 to 51 | 49-51.

(2) Books with Authors and Editors

  1. Authors’ names: John Dickinson; Amy White | John Dickinson and Amy White,
  2. Title of book: Academic Vocabulary | Academic vocabulary,
  3. Editors’ names: Jason Dillon | ed. Jason Dillon
  4. Publication place: London | (London:
  5. Publisher name: Universal Print | Universal Print,
  6. Year of publication: 2020 | 2020),
  7. Page numbers: 17 | 17.

(3) Books with Contributing Authors

  1. Authors’ names: Simon Smart | Simon Smart,
  2. Title of chapter: The Body Paragraph | “The body paragraph,”
  3. Title of book: Writing Academically | in Writing academically,
  4. Editors’ names: Jason Dillon | ed. Jason Dillon
  5. Publication place: Paris | (Paris:
  6. Publisher name: Reference Ltd. | Reference Ltd.,
  7. Publication year: 2020 | (2020),
  8. Page numbers: info page 21, chapter pages 17 to 25 | 21.

(4) Books with Different Editions

  1. Authors’ names: John Dickinson | John Dickinson,
  2. Title of book: Guide to Academic Writing | Guide to academic writing,
  3. Edition: Third | 3rd edition
  4. Publication place: New York | (New York:
  5. Publisher name: Academic Publications | Academic Publications,
  6. Publication year: 2015 | 2015),
  7. Page numbers: 49 to 51 | 49-51.

(5) Conference Proceedings

  1. Authors’ names: Yijing Zhang; Zilin Zhang | Yiijing Zhang and Zilin Zhang,
  2. Title of paper: Using English in the Classroom | “Using English in the classroom”
  3. Title of conference: 7th Conference on EAP | (paper presented at 7th EAP conference,
  4. Conference place: London, UK | London, UK,
  5. Conference date: 4th to 10th of April | April 4-10,
  6. Publication year: 2019 | 2019).

(6) Dissertations/Theses

  1. Authors’ names: Zilin Zhang | Zilin Zhang,
  2. Title of thesis: A corpus investigation of EAP | “A corpus investigation of EAP,”
  3. Type of submission: PhD Dissertation | (PhD thesis,
  4. Degree awarding body: University of Exeter | University of Exeter,
  5. Submission year: 2012 | 2012),
  6. Page numbers: 101 to 105 | 101-105.

(7) Graphic Data

  1. Authors’ names: Laura Jones and Job Marley | Laura Jones and Job Marley
  2. Title of source: Helpful Statistics | Helpful statistics,
  3. Type of graphic: Bar Chart | bar chart
  4. Publication place: Lisbon, Portugal | (Lisbon:
  5. Publisher name: Graphic Print | Graphic Print,
  6. Publication year: 1996 | 1996),
  7. Page numbers: page 99 | 99.

(8) Government Publications

  1. Department name: UK Government | UK Government,
  2. Title of source: Average Life Expectancy 2015 | Average life expectancy 2015
  3. Publication place: London, England | (London:
  4. Publisher name: UK Government | UK Government,
  5. Publication year: 2018 | 2018).

(9) Journal Articles

  1. Authors’ names: John Smith | John Smith,
  2. Title of article: An Investigation into Academia | “An investigation into academia,”
  3. Title of journal: Academic Practices | Academic Practices
  4. Volume and issue: Volume 17; Issue 2 | 17, no. 2
  5. Publication year: 1999 | (1999):
  6. Page numbers: information page 10, article pages 4 to 14| 10.

(10) Magazine Articles

  1. Authors’ names: Jane Bloggs and Jack Frost | Jane Bloggs and Jack Frost,
  2. Title of article: Happy Students? | “Happy students,”
  3. Title of magazine: On Campus | On Campus,
  4. Publication date: October 10th 2001 | October 10,
  5. Publication year: 2001 | 2001.

(11) Newspaper Articles

  1. Authors’ names: Jack Frost | Jack Frost,
  2. Title of article: Is Harvard Selling Out? | “Is Harvard selling out?,”
  3. Title of newspaper: Campus Periodical | Campus Periodical,
  4. Publication date: 19th of October 2017 | October 19,
  5. Publication year: 2017 | 2017.

Well done on getting to the end of this first lesson in our short course on referencing sources in Chicago. In addition to learning about how to reference printed source types, why not continue on with Lesson 2 to find out about the wide array of digital sources also on offer. You can also unlock, download and complete our Lesson 1 Worksheet to check your understanding and progress – and further improve your English proficiency.

For more information, see the Chicago Manual of Style (https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/home.html).

1 of 2 Lessons Completed

Materials

Once you’ve completed all three lessons in this short course about Referencing Sources in Chicago, you might then wish to download our Lesson Worksheets to check your progress or print for your students. These professional PDF worksheets can be easily accessed for only a few Academic Marks.

Lesson 1 explores the topic: How are printed sources referenced in Chicago? Our Lesson 1 Worksheet (containing guidance, activities and answer keys) can be accessed here at the click of a button. 

Lesson 2 explores the topic: How does Chicago style reference digital sources? Our Lesson 2 Worksheet (containing guidance, activities and answer keys) can be accessed here at the click of a button. 

To save yourself 1 Marks, click on the button below to gain unlimited access to all of our Referencing Sources in Chicago Lesson Worksheets. This All-in-1 Pack includes every lesson, activity and answer key related this topic in one handy and professional PDF.

Media

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